Review: “Walking To Listen” by Andrew Forsthoefel

I few months ago I went through a phase of fascination with the Appalachian Trail. The idea of walking 2,181 miles with nothing but your backpack and resilience was (and still is) kind of romantic in an incredibly awful sort of way. Reading and listening to the stories of individuals who had the initiative to… Continue reading Review: “Walking To Listen” by Andrew Forsthoefel

Review: The Curious Christian by Barnabas Piper

Faith is meant to lived loudly. It is meant to ask questions, seek out knowledge, and declare truth. It is meant to stand boldly not shirk quietly. It is meant to encompass the entirety of life and redeem it. Faith should not be kept in a box taken out only on Sunday mornings and it… Continue reading Review: The Curious Christian by Barnabas Piper

Review: “When Breath Becomes Air” by Paul Kalanithi

I never cry when I'm reading. In fact, reading is not an outwardly emotional activity for me. Even when reading some of the most tragic and the most beautiful literature produced by English, I do not cry. This book changed that. This book broke that because it broke me in a multitude of ways. I was… Continue reading Review: “When Breath Becomes Air” by Paul Kalanithi

Review: “Near Christianity: How Journeys Along Jewish-Christian Borders Saved My Faith in God” by Anthony Le Donne

C.S.Lewis's Mere Christianity is considered a classic of Christian apologetics. Any young Christian seeking to understand the difficult, and often frightening, world of apologetics is almost guaranteed to have Lewis's work thrust upon them. In fact, very few Christians can honestly say that Mere Christianity has not been recommended to them at point. This is because Mere Christianity, like most of… Continue reading Review: “Near Christianity: How Journeys Along Jewish-Christian Borders Saved My Faith in God” by Anthony Le Donne

Review: “White Trash. The 400 Year Untold History of Class in America” by Nancy Isenberg

I found this book perusing the shelves of my favorite bookstore. It was prominently placed as one of their "books of the month". I don't normally pay attention to "books of the month" because they often aren't my style. But this one I was intrigued by. There has been so much discourse on class in… Continue reading Review: “White Trash. The 400 Year Untold History of Class in America” by Nancy Isenberg

Review: "The Romanov Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra" by Helen Rappaport

I have tried and failed to Anna Karenina at least four times. So I didn't think that I was going to be able to make it through this book about the last ruling family of Russia. Much to my surprise, I didn't just trudge through this book. I actually enjoyed it. In The Romanov Sisters… Continue reading Review: "The Romanov Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra" by Helen Rappaport

Review: "Sleeping Embers of An Ordinary Mind" by Ann Charnock

As I was perusing through the Kindle book store, looking for an ebook that was reasonably priced and had some pizzazz, I stumbled across Sleeping Embers. I hoped the book would imaginatively delve into the life that female Renaissance painter Antonia Uccello could have led. I wanted a book that explored the lives of women… Continue reading Review: "Sleeping Embers of An Ordinary Mind" by Ann Charnock

Review: "What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect The Practice of Medicine" by Danielle Ofri, MD

When I picked up this book, I expected a book full of technical mumbo-jumbo. I expected it to dull and boring, and honestly I had no intention of ever finishing it. It just something I started to take up my time. Boy, I was wrong. From the moment I read the first word, I was… Continue reading Review: "What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect The Practice of Medicine" by Danielle Ofri, MD